June 17, 2011 - The New York medical examiner rules that Jerry Borg's death on Dec. 15, 2010 is a result of inhaling toxic substances from the dust cloud generated by the collapsing twin towers. This brings the number of victims at the World Trade Center site to 2,753 and the overall 9/11 victim death toll to 2,977.

Aug. 23, 2011 - The New York City Medical Examiner's office announces that remains from the World Trade Center have been positively identified as 40-year-old Ernest James. As of this date, 1,632 victims have been identified, leaving as many as 1,121 unidentified.

Feb. 10, 2012 - The New York City Chief Medical Examiner's office announces that remains from the World Trade Center have been positively identified as 42-year-old Karol Ann Keasler. As of this date, 1,633 victims have been identified, leaving as many as 1,120 unidentified.

July 5, 2013 - Remains are identified as firefighter Lt. Jeffrey P. Waltz, who was last seen in the north tower of the WTC.

Victim Compensation Fund:

Operates from December 2001 to 2003.

The Victim Compensation Fund receives 7,408 applications for both death claims and personal injury claims.

The fund makes awards in 5,560 of those cases.

Jan. 2, 2011 - President Barack Obama signs James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010, reopening and expanding the scope of the VCF.

Economic Impact:

$500,000 - Estimated amount of money it cost to plan and execute the 9/11 attacks.

$123 billion - Estimated economic loss during the first 2-4 weeks after the World Trade Center towers collapsed in New York City, as well as decline in airline travel over next few years

$60 billion - Estimated cost of the WTC site damage, including damage to surrounding buildings, infrastructure and subway facilities.

$40 billion - Value of the emergency anti-terrorism package approved by the U.S. Congress on Sept. 14, 2001.

$15 billion - Aid package passed by Congress to bail out the airlines.

$9.3 billion - Insurance claims arising from the 9/11 attacks.

Cleanup at ground zero:

Cleanup at ground zero officially ends on May 30, 2002.

It took 3.1 million hours of labor to clean up 1.8 million tons of debris.

The total cost of cleanup was $750 million.

Homeland Security:

The Department of Homeland Security is created in response to Sept. 11.

It merges 22 governmental agencies into one, including the Customs Service, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the U.S. Coast Guard and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The Dept. of Homeland Security places 130 U.S. inspectors at ports in major European, Asian and Muslim nations, as well as strategically-located ports, to inspect cargo for nuclear, chemical or biological weapons being smuggled into the U.S.

The Homeland Security Advisory System is introduced on March 12, 2002.