WESTHAMPTON BEACH, New York (CNN) -

Hillary Clinton, who has yet to comment about the protests over the death of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, ignored questions about the incident on Sunday.

After signing more than 700 books at Book & Books in Westhampton Beach, New York, Clinton was asked by two reporters for her reaction to the controversy.

Clinton ignored both questions and left the bookstore.

Liberal activists and civil rights leaders have asked Clinton for her response, saying she is the presumed front-runner for her party's presidential nomination in 2016 and that she has commented on major news stories in the past.

Michael Brown was shot dead earlier this month by a Missouri police officer. The shooting sparked large protests in the St. Louis suburb, which were highlighted by looting and a sizable police presence.

Attorney General Eric Holder visited Ferguson last week to check in on the federal civil rights investigation into the shooting, and President Barack Obama's White House has begun to look into the equipment the federal government provides to police forces.

At a rally earlier this month about the killing, Rev. Al Sharpton, a civil rights leader and host on MSNBC, said, "Jeb Bush, Hillary Clinton, don't get laryngitis on this issue."

He then added, "Nobody can go to the White House unless they stop by our house and talk about policing."

Clinton was received in the tony New York beach town. Countless attendees urged her to run for president and some even demanded that she do so.

"You've gotta run," said one woman. "I want to vote for you." Another told Clinton that voting for her was on her bucket list, adding, "You can't deny me of that, right?"

Clinton also slightly tipped her hand on running a few times.

When one man said his brother was her youngest canvasser during her failed 2008 bid, Clinton respond with a smile, "Keep up your strength."

Two attendees offered mild protest to the former secretary of state. One asked a question about the United States' role in Iran and another said she disapproved of the way Clinton handled the Arab Spring.

In the latter case, Clinton urged the man to read her book.